Avoid These Mistakes in Narration, Tense, and Voice

Writing can become unclear when you change the narration abruptly for no apparent reason. There are three types of…


Marveling at Enneagram Seven to Write Better Characters

Learn from Marvel's Star-Lord about how to use Enneagram Seven to create a character arc.


Don’t Let Them Dangle

How to place modifiers correctly to improve sentence clarity.


Marveling at Enneagram Six to Write Better Characters

Learn from Marvel's Black Widow about how to use Enneagram Six to create a character arc.


Fist bumps photo

The Mythmakers' Guild

Our Facebook Writer’s community, called The Mythmakers’ Guild, is for aspiring sci-fi and fantasy authors to encourage each other and get advice from the professional writers and editors in the group. Visit our Communities page for more information.

Podcasts & Audio Publishing

Our podcast, The Wayfarer’s Guide to Worldbuilding is a tool to help writers, DMs, and creatives build better worlds. Each episode explores one facet of worldbuilding and gives practical advice on how to make these elements realistic.

About Us

We are a small press that publishes science fiction, fantasy, and select nonfiction. We’re passionate about bringing undervalued voices to the printed page, those who have amazing stories to tell. And we love unique worldbuilding.

How We're Different

We act like a traditional publisher, committed to the editing, design, and marketing for our books, but with the advantages of a small press. We are able to give our writers loving attention and encourage aspiring authors to learn and grow through our communities.

Anyone in the #WritingCommunity write short stories, flash fiction, or poetry? I'm an editor for a literary magazine & we're always on the lookout for new writers & poets. Come on down! Send me your stuff. I'd love to read it.

Our publicists' biggest tip for breaking through writer's block: give yourself permission to write badly.

It's okay for first drafts to be rough, messy, even (dare we say it) bad! Get out of your head, don't be paralyzed by perfectionism. After all, you can't edit a blank page.

@mythosandink To me "said" or "asked" & the like are my preferred tags when I write & also when I read. They tend to be almost invisible, a quiet way of keeping straight who is speaking without slowing the flow. Overuse of fancier tags is, again to me as a reader, annoying & distracting.

A common piece of writing advice is to use simple dialogue tags like "said" or "asked" most of the time, and only rarely switch them out for fancier terms like "exclaimed" or "shrieked".

Do you agree with this? Or are you team spicy-speaker-tags?

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