How to Avoid the “No Practice Needed” Trope

The protagonist gains a new skill, either in magic or combat, and is immediately an expert without any training. Sound…


Pitfalls of the Chosen One Trope

Avoid these common mistakes with the Chosen One trope to keep your characters fresh.


Don’t Leave Your Female Characters in the Fridge

When female characters die, avoid fridging them and make their deaths matter.


Marveling at Enneagram Nine to Write Better Characters

Learn from Hawkeye about how to use the Enneagram Nine to create a character arc.


Marveling at Enneagram Seven to Write Better Characters

Learn from Marvel's Star-Lord about how to use Enneagram Seven to create a character arc.


Marveling at Enneagram Six to Write Better Characters

Learn from Marvel's Black Widow about how to use Enneagram Six to create a character arc.


How to Write an Effective Action Scene

The two keys you need to write fast-paced action scenes.


5 Tips for Writing an Unlikeable Protagonist (According to Final Space)

How do you make an unlikeable protagonist likeable? Just ask Gary Goodspeed.


How to Kill Your Darlings

How to craft a stronger work by getting rid of the elements that don't serve a purpose.


Marveling at Enneagram Five to Write Better Characters

Learn from Marvel's Hulk about how to use Enneagram Five to create a character arc.


Marveling at Enneagram Four to Write Better Characters

Learn from Marvel's Loki about how to use Enneagram Four to create a character arc.


How to Incorporate Mythology into your Fiction

Want to include allusions to your favourite myths in your novel? Here are three ways to do it.


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Anyone in the #WritingCommunity write short stories, flash fiction, or poetry? I'm an editor for a literary magazine & we're always on the lookout for new writers & poets. Come on down! Send me your stuff. I'd love to read it.

Our publicists' biggest tip for breaking through writer's block: give yourself permission to write badly.

It's okay for first drafts to be rough, messy, even (dare we say it) bad! Get out of your head, don't be paralyzed by perfectionism. After all, you can't edit a blank page.

@mythosandink To me "said" or "asked" & the like are my preferred tags when I write & also when I read. They tend to be almost invisible, a quiet way of keeping straight who is speaking without slowing the flow. Overuse of fancier tags is, again to me as a reader, annoying & distracting.

A common piece of writing advice is to use simple dialogue tags like "said" or "asked" most of the time, and only rarely switch them out for fancier terms like "exclaimed" or "shrieked".

Do you agree with this? Or are you team spicy-speaker-tags?

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