Analyze Your Sentences for these Three Errors

It's easy to accidentally mix constructions so your sentence parts don’t fit together.


Avoid These Mistakes in Narration, Tense, and Voice

Writing can become unclear when you change the narration abruptly for no apparent reason. There are three types of…


Don’t Let Them Dangle

How to place modifiers correctly to improve sentence clarity.


How to Write an Effective Action Scene

The two keys you need to write fast-paced action scenes.


How to Give Helpful Story Critiques

Follow these techniques to give helpful feedback on someone else's work.


Editing Explained, Part 4: Proofreading

The goal is to make everything look as perfect as possible before publication or submission to an editor.  


Editing Explained, Part 3: Copy Editing

Copy editing is formatting everything according to a style guide and fixing inconsistencies.


Editing Explained, Part 2: Line Editing

Line editors focus on paragraph-level issues instead of broader story issues.


Editing Explained, Part 1: Substantive Editing

Substantive editing is the first step after your draft is complete, and should occur before correcting grammar,…


The Breakdown on Adverbs

Here are a couple things to keep in mind using adverbs in your writing.


On Crushing Writers’ Dreams

No one prepared me for how bad I would feel potentially crushing writers' dreams by rejecting their query letters.


What is a Writer’s “Voice”?

If Douglas Adams, J. R. R. Tolkien, and J. K. Rowling wrote stories based on the same plot outline, the resulting…


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Anyone in the #WritingCommunity write short stories, flash fiction, or poetry? I'm an editor for a literary magazine & we're always on the lookout for new writers & poets. Come on down! Send me your stuff. I'd love to read it.

Our publicists' biggest tip for breaking through writer's block: give yourself permission to write badly.

It's okay for first drafts to be rough, messy, even (dare we say it) bad! Get out of your head, don't be paralyzed by perfectionism. After all, you can't edit a blank page.

@mythosandink To me "said" or "asked" & the like are my preferred tags when I write & also when I read. They tend to be almost invisible, a quiet way of keeping straight who is speaking without slowing the flow. Overuse of fancier tags is, again to me as a reader, annoying & distracting.

A common piece of writing advice is to use simple dialogue tags like "said" or "asked" most of the time, and only rarely switch them out for fancier terms like "exclaimed" or "shrieked".

Do you agree with this? Or are you team spicy-speaker-tags?

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