On Crushing Writers’ Dreams

No one prepared me for how bad I would feel potentially crushing writers' dreams by rejecting their query letters.


Don’t Give Up Querying. However…

Gaining that coveted title of "author" takes hard work. However, here is what some writers fail to consider.


5 Mistakes that Kill Your First Chapter

If you find agents and editors are not asking to look further than your first chapter, check it for these issues.


How to Pitch Your Book in 280 Characters or Less

Five examples of well-written pitches and five things I look for in a Twitter pitch.


How to Write an Attractive Query Letter

This one little page of information is as crucial as the thousands of words you spent months painstakingly crafting.


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Anyone in the #WritingCommunity write short stories, flash fiction, or poetry? I'm an editor for a literary magazine & we're always on the lookout for new writers & poets. Come on down! Send me your stuff. I'd love to read it.

Our publicists' biggest tip for breaking through writer's block: give yourself permission to write badly.

It's okay for first drafts to be rough, messy, even (dare we say it) bad! Get out of your head, don't be paralyzed by perfectionism. After all, you can't edit a blank page.

@mythosandink To me "said" or "asked" & the like are my preferred tags when I write & also when I read. They tend to be almost invisible, a quiet way of keeping straight who is speaking without slowing the flow. Overuse of fancier tags is, again to me as a reader, annoying & distracting.

A common piece of writing advice is to use simple dialogue tags like "said" or "asked" most of the time, and only rarely switch them out for fancier terms like "exclaimed" or "shrieked".

Do you agree with this? Or are you team spicy-speaker-tags?

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