How to Incorporate Mythology into your Fiction

Want to include allusions to your favourite myths in your novel? Here are three ways to do it.


How to Write a Poetic Prophecy

Thinking about writing a poetic prophecy for your novel? Make sure you follow these steps.


How to Build Your Novel’s Magic System

If you have specific rules for how magic works in your world, you can do some pretty fun things with it.


5 Unique Magic Systems to Inspire Your Own

Whether magic has detailed rules or its source is a mystery, the way it impacts the world is fascinating to explore.


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Anyone in the #WritingCommunity write short stories, flash fiction, or poetry? I'm an editor for a literary magazine & we're always on the lookout for new writers & poets. Come on down! Send me your stuff. I'd love to read it.

Our publicists' biggest tip for breaking through writer's block: give yourself permission to write badly.

It's okay for first drafts to be rough, messy, even (dare we say it) bad! Get out of your head, don't be paralyzed by perfectionism. After all, you can't edit a blank page.

@mythosandink To me "said" or "asked" & the like are my preferred tags when I write & also when I read. They tend to be almost invisible, a quiet way of keeping straight who is speaking without slowing the flow. Overuse of fancier tags is, again to me as a reader, annoying & distracting.

A common piece of writing advice is to use simple dialogue tags like "said" or "asked" most of the time, and only rarely switch them out for fancier terms like "exclaimed" or "shrieked".

Do you agree with this? Or are you team spicy-speaker-tags?

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